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SHIKOKU TOURS

Travel and Adventure

Crafts

Shikoku Crafts

Shikoku Crafts

Shikoku is home to a wide variety of attractive traditional crafts.

Indigo Crafts

Indigo Crafts

Shikoku is home to many traditional crafts, and one of the most prominent is indigo dyeing, a once-thriving industry that has its roots in Wakimachi, Tokushima.

Wasanbon

Wasanbon

Wasanbon is a fine-grained Japanese sugar, traditionally made in Tokushima and Kagawa. The sugar is often used for Japanese sweets (wagashi).

Matsuyama Top Ten

Matsuyama Top Ten

In this series of articles, we look at the top ten places in the four main cities of Shikoku – Matsuyama, Kochi, Tokushima and Takamatsu. Here we look at Matsuyama, the capital of Ehime Prefecture, and the largest city on Shikoku.

Imabari Textiles and Towels

Imabari Textiles and Towels

Imabari has been manufacturing towels for over 120 years, and textiles for even longer. The city is the largest producer of towels in Japan, and today ‘Imabari Towel’ is one of the world’s favourite brands.

Tokushima Top Ten

Tokushima Top Ten

In this series of articles, we look at the top ten places in the four main cities of Shikoku. Here we look at Tokushima, the capital of Tokushima Prefecture.

The Uchiko Lantern Festival

The Uchiko Lantern Festival

The town of Uchiko, known for its streets of well-preserved historic buildings, museums and stylish eateries, holds a Lantern Festival each year in mid-September.

The Uchiko Bamboo Festival

The Uchiko Bamboo Festival

The town of Uchiko is known for its streets of well-preserved historic buildings, museums and stylish eateries. In early August, Uchiko holds its Bamboo Festival when the main street is decorated with bamboo poles hung with elaborate decorations.

Nagoro, the Village of Dolls

Nagoro, the Village of Dolls

The little village of Nagoro, deep in the valleys of Tokushima Prefecture is known around the world as the Village of the Dolls. As the population of Nagoro declined precipitately, Tsukimi Ayano started to replace the people who left or died with life-sized replicas made of straw and old clothes.