Frequently Asked Questions - About Shikoku

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About Shikoku

The peak periods are in the Golden Week period from April 28 to May 5, Obon from August 11 to 20, and New Year from December 28 to January 5.

For more detailed information, see our blog post.

Yes, there are.

Wild boar. They usually try to run away, but people have been killed by boar.

Pit vipers. Something of a hazard in the countryside in summer and autumn. Hospitalization if bitten.

Hornets. Something of a hazard in the countryside in summer and autumn. Hospitalization if stung.

Centipedes. Something of a hazard in summer and autumn. Painful bite.

Jellyfish. Something of a hazard in the sea in summer and autumn. Painful and itchy sting.

Sharks. A very rare hazard in the sea.

Ticks. Something of a hazard in the countryside in summer and autumn. Ticks carrying the SFTS virus have been identified in Shikoku.

Dogs and cats. Caution is required. If in doubt, don’t try to pet them.

Despite the presence of these dangerous animals, most of us manage to stay alive and well in Shikoku. Use common sense and you’ll be OK. All these animals are found in the rest of Japan too. But unlike the rest of Japan, Shikoku doesn’t have bears.

Yes, there are. As home to the Shikoku Pilgrimage, one of the few circular pilgrimages in the world, the island of Shikoku is itself one big power spot, which draws people from around the world to walk the pilgrim’s path between the 88 Buddhist pilgrimage temples. But this aside, there are many individual sites on Shikoku that are known as power spots.

For more detailed information, see our blog post.

No. Prices of everything in Shikoku are very reasonable to cheap compared with destinations in other developed countries. Although Japan had a reputation as an expensive destination, that's no longer true at all. And since the price of many things in Shikoku is significantly lower than on Honshu, you may be pleasantly surprised by how far your money goes here.